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Category: Rock

Take The A Train

9 thoughts on “ Take The A Train

  1. Mar 11,  · Duke Ellington ’s signature composition was “Take the A Train,” written by his frequent collaborator Billy Strayhorn. The song brought Ellington and his .
  2. After being handcuffed to New York City's 'A' train by his prep school friends, young Karim is forced to ride all the way to the last stop, Far Rockaway. On his journey, he comes of age, meeting a diverse group of people, from a random business man to Keisha, a girl he inevitably falls for/10(12).
  3. You must take the "A" train To go to Sugar Hill, way up in Harlem If you miss the "A" train You'll find you missed the quickest way to Harlem. Hurry, get on, now it's coming Listen to those rails a-thrumming all aboard Get on the "A" train Soon you will be on Sugar Hill in Harlem. You must take the "A" train To go to Sugar Hill, way up in Harlem.
  4. Watch: New Singing Lesson Videos Can Make Anyone A Great Singer You must take the "A" train To go to Sugar Hill, way up in Harlem If you miss the "A" train You'll find you missed the quickest way to Harlem Hurry, get on, now it's coming Listen to those rails a-thrumming All aboard, get on the "A" train Soon you will be on Sugar Hill in Harlem You must take the "A" train To go to Sugar Hill.
  5. Take the "A" Train marked Strayhorn's breakthrough as a composer. This compelling dance number became a hit recording, and Ellington made it his orchestra's signature tune from until the end of .
  6. Strayhorn's Take the A Train is played by a jazz - ensemble with soloists. It features -meter and - themes. big band, quadruple, disjunct Which best describes the form of Take the A train?
  7. Jun 12,  · "Take the A Train" was written by a kid who lived in Pittsburgh named Billy Strayhorn. Strayhorn was a soda jerk and drugstore delivery boy by day, Author: Brooke Gladstone.
  8. In fact, he said that the music and lyrics for "Take the A Train," originally recorded on February 15, by Ellington for Victor Records, came more quickly than the subject of the song itself – the New York subway line to the Sugar Hill District of Harlem. It was so easy for him, he said it was "like writing a letter to a friend.".
  9. The saxophones in unison have the melody--an oddly disjunct line that fits the words, "Youyou take the A train!" that is snappy but oddly dissonant in the whole-tone bars. The melody itself is answered by engagingly syncopated responses from the trumpet and trombone sections. Ironically, this is as complicated as the arrangement gets.

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